The havamal sayings of the high one. Hávamál 2019-03-11

The havamal sayings of the high one Rating: 7,8/10 329 reviews

The Havamal

the havamal sayings of the high one

A seventeenth I know: so that e'en the shy maiden is slow to shun my love. Drink ale by the hearth, over ice glide, Buy a stained sword, buy a starving mare To fatten at home: and fatten the watch-dog. Over time other poems were added to the original content dealing with wisdom which seemed, by their nature, to imply that the speaker was Odin. Each man should be watchful and wary in speech, and slow to put faith in a friend. All will prove true that thou askest of runes -- those that are come from the gods, which the high Powers wrought, and which Odin painted: then silence is surely best. Five separate elements are pretty clearly recognizable: 1 the Havamal proper stanzas 1-80 , a collection of proverbs and counsels for the conduct of life; 2 the Loddfafnismol stanzas 111-138 , a collection somewhat similar to the first, but specifically addressed to a certain Loddfafnir; 3 the Ljothatal stanzas 147-165 , a collection of charms; 4 the lovestory of Odin and Billing's daughter stanzas 96-102 ; 5 the story of how Odin got the mead of poetry from the maiden Gunnloth stanzas 103-110.

Next

“Hávamál” (“Sayings of the High One”; translated from Old Norse)

the havamal sayings of the high one

The generous and bold have the best lives, Are seldom beset by cares, , But the base man sees bogies everywhere And the miser pines for presents. Prose version 1893 Tommaso Cannizzaro as Fragments of in Fiori D'Oltralpe Saggio di Traduzioni Poetiche, pp. Hew wood in wind, sail the seas in a breeze, woo a maid in the dark, -- for day's eyes are many, -- work a ship for its gliding, a shield for its shelter, a sword for its striking, a maid for her kiss; 82. So Thundr carved before the history of the peoples, when he rose up and when he came back. Holm as excerpts in Mundsmag af den ældre Edda 1869 Frederik Winkel Horn as in Den ældre Edda 1870 H.

Next

The Havamal

the havamal sayings of the high one

The fastest friends may fall out When they sit at the banquet-board: It is, and shall be, a shameful thing When guest quarrels with guest, The wise guest has his way of dealing With those who taunt him at table: He smiles through the meal, not seeming to hear The twaddle talked by his foes. He must rise betimes who hath few to serve him, and see to his work himself; who sleeps at morning is hindered much, to the keen is wealth half-won. A fifth I know: when I see, by foes shot, speeding a shaft through the host, flies it never so strongly I still can stay it, if I get but a glimpse of its flight. The tactful guest will take his leave Early, not linger long: He starts to stink who outstays his welcome In a hall that is not his own. Two are hosts against one, the tongue is the head's bane, 'neath a rough hide a hand may be hid; he is glad at nightfall who knows of his lodging, short is the ship's berth, and changeful the autumn night, much veers the wind ere the fifth day and blows round yet more in a month. I know a ninth: when need I have To shelter my ship on the flood, The wind it calms, the waves it smoothes And puts the sea to sleep, I know a tenth: if troublesome ghosts Ride the rafters aloft, I can work it so they wander astray, Unable to find their forms, Unable to find their homes.

Next

The Havamal

the havamal sayings of the high one

The unwise man thinks all to know, while he sits in a sheltered nook; but he knows not one thing, what he shall answer, if men shall put him to proof. Too many unstable words are spoken by him who ne'er holds his peace; the hasty tongue sings its own mishap if it be not bridled in. Do you know how you must interpret? Of dry logs saved and roof-bark stored a man can know the measure, of fire-wood too which should last him out quarter and half years to come. I know a sixth: it will save me if a man Cut runes on a sapling' s Roots With intent to harm; it turns the spell; The hater is harmed, not me. If you must journey to mountains and firths, Take food and fodder with you. Never reproach the plight of another, For it happens to many men: Strong desire may stupefy heroes, Dull the wits of the wise The mind alone knows what is near the heart, Each is his own judge: The worst sickness for a wise man Is to crave what he cannot enjoy. Cherish those near you, never be The first to break with a friend: Care eats him who can no longer Open his heart to another.

Next

The Havamal

the havamal sayings of the high one

I know a thirteenth if I throw a cup Of water over a warrior, He shall not fall in the fiercest battle, Nor sink beneath the sword, I know a fourteenth, that few know: If I tell a troop of warriors About the high ones, elves and gods, I can name them one by one. Mock not the traveller met On the road, Nor maliciously laugh at the guest: Scoff not at guests nor to the gate chase them, But relieve the lonely and wretched, The sitters in the hall seldom know The kin of the new-comer: The best man is marred by faults, The worst is not without worth. Here and there bits of verse crept in; and of course the loose structure of the poem made it easy for any reciter to insert new stanzas almost at will. Thus a catalogue of runes, or charms, was tacked on, and also a set of proverbs. Codex Regius employs large initial letters, which are otherwise used only to begin poems, at the beginning of verses 1, 111, and 138. Greetings to the host, The guest has arrived, In which seat shall he sit? Wise is he not who is never silent, Mouthing meaningless words: A glib tongue that goes on chattering Sings to its own harm. I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels, they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them, they will work thy weal if thou win'st them: be not a shoemaker nor yet a shaft maker save for thyself alone: let the shoe be misshapen, or crooked the shaft, and a curse on thy head will be called.

Next

Havamal

the havamal sayings of the high one

Thus a catalogue of runes, or charms, was tacked on, and also a set of proverbs. I know a seventeenth: if I sing it, the young Girl will be slow to forsake me. In 1891, Karl Müllenhoff suggested that Hávamál consisted of six poems, whose only common feature was that Odin was the speaker in all of them. Martin Clarke, The Hávamál reprinted 2011 1971 Jere Fleck, Óðinn's Self-Sacrifice—A New Interpretation: Excerpts in , Scandinavian Studies, Vol. The pine tree wastes which is perched on the hill, nor bark nor needles shelter it; such is the man whom none doth love; for what should he longer live? In the fool who acquires cattle and lands, Or wins a woman's love, His wisdom wanes with his waxing pride, He sinks from sense to conceit. If you deal with another you don't trust But wish for his good-will, Be fair in speech but false in thought And give him lie for lie.

Next

The Havamal

the havamal sayings of the high one

A guest thinks him witty who mocks at a guest and runs from his wrath away; but none can be sure who jests at a meal that he makes not fun among foes. I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels, they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them, they will work thy weal if thou win'st them: tell not ever an evil man if misfortunes thee befall, from such ill friend thou needst never seek return for thy trustful mind. If it presents the worldly wisdom of a violent race, it also shows noble ideals of loyalty, truth, and unfaltering courage. Few gnomic collections in the world's literary history present sounder wisdom more tersely expressed than the Havamal. Brand kindles brand till they burn out, Flame is quickened by flame: One man from another is known by his speech The simpleton by his silence.

Next

Havamal Text and translation of the Havamal, from the Old Norse Elder Edda: The Sayings of the High One.

the havamal sayings of the high one

There is mingling in friendship when man can utter all his whole mind to another; there is nought so vile as a fickle tongue; no friend is he who but flatters. I know a third: in the thick of battle, If my need be great enough, It will blunt the edges of enemy swords, Their weapons will make no wounds. Now is answered what you ask of the runes, Graven by the gods, Made by the All Father, Sent by the powerful sage: lt. Ere long I bare fruit, and throve full well, I grew and waxed in wisdom; word following word, I found me words, deed following deed, I wrought deeds. Over time other poems were added to the original content dealing with wisdom which seemed, by their nature, to imply that the speaker was Odin. The weather changes in many ways in five days, and more in a month.

Next